IRS 501(c)(3) Application, Form 1023

IRS FORM 1023
ATTACHMENTS
FOR
ORIENT LAND TRUST

April 4, 2003

Contents

Part II, Item 1. Activities and Operational Information

Part II, Item 3. Fundraising Program

Part II, Item 4a and 4b. Directors and Officers

Part II, Item 8. Assets Used in Exempt Activity

Part II, Item 11. Membership

Part II, Item 12a. Visitor Fees and Charges

Financial Data, Statement of Revenue and Expenses...

Part IV, Item A, Column (b). Year 2002

Part IV, Item A, Column (c). Year 2003

Part IV, Item A, Column (d). Year 2004

 

Part II, Item 1. Activities and Operational Information

Background Information

Orient Land Trust (OLT) is located in Saguache County in the San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado. The goal of this organization is to preserve and protect the natural and historical elements of the land in the area that includes Valley View Hot Springs and the Orient Mine, including approximately 1,900 acres. See map attached as Exhibit C.

Valley View Hot Springs is located on a parcel of land that was originally homesteaded in 1873. It has been operated as a small rustic resort since the early 1900’s. Currently, many of the buildings still in use on the property date back to those early days. The creators of Orient Land Trust have operated Valley View Hot Springs as a family-oriented, naturist (clothing-optional) resort since 1975, and have owned it since 1979. Over the past twenty-five years, Valley View has acquired a large group of loyal and dedicated visitors. In addition to the repeat visitors, there are always many new visitors who are interested in the hot springs, bat colony, hydroelectric plant, spelunking, historical sites and other unique features of the area. Overall, visitors are a very diverse group made up of people from all age groups, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds, and they come from all over Colorado and beyond. They share a true appreciation of Valley View Hot Springs and the surrounding area for its simplicity, remoteness and beauty.

Orient Mine was an iron mine that began operation in the mid 1800’s and was abandoned by 1938. Purchased by the founders of OLT in 1984, the mine includes ruins of the original prospect high in the mountains, foundations of buildings in the town built later at a lower elevation, the narrow gauge railroad track which served until 1932 and the mine workings themselves. (See map in Exhibit C.) For the last thirty years it has been the summer home for a colony (estimated between 100,000 to 250,000) of Mexican free-tail bats - Tadarida Brasiliensis. It is the northernmost and largest bachelor colony known in North America.

The San Luis Valley, including Saguache County in particular, is experiencing growing development pressures. The lands to be preserved by OLT are located less than fifteen miles from the newest National Park in the country, the Great Sand Dunes National Park. Real estate prices have escalated rapidly in the last decade. There would be strong pressure on any future owners of this land to subdivide or develop it into a more upscale resort. The current owners of Valley View and Orient Mine decided to create OLT to provide a means for the ongoing protection and preservation of this area. Orient Land Trust is a Colorado Nonprofit Corporation since March 2001. Starting January 1, 2004, the founders will lease the land and facilities to OLT for $1 per year. OLT will protect the land and operate the facilities. Then, over time, the owners plan to donate their fee simple ownership of the land to OLT as well.

Activities of the Orient Land Trust

A. Providing and managing the facilities which enable the public to appreciate the unique features of the area.

Percent of time devoted to this activity: 40%

OLT is located at the end of a seven mile gravel road. It is surrounded on all sides by public lands. The nearest town (population 50) is twelve miles away. Valley View Hot Springs provides lodging and other facilities to OLT visitors, who would otherwise have to travel a great distance for accommodations. Visitors are able to stay in rustic historic cabins, one of two small lodges, or a campground.

Valley View Hot Springs itself will continue to be a focal point for OLT. It provides the public with an opportunity to enjoy hot springs in a natural setting, as opposed to most other hot springs located on private property which are generally extensively developed. At Valley View, visitors are able to soak in natural gravel bottomed pools and to feel the surge of the carbonated hot spring water coming up all around them. As the hot springs are truly an oasis, it is not uncommon to have wildlife approach a pool for a drink while people are soaking. Visitors are able to become a part of the natural environment around them without a barrier of any kind.

But the appreciation of the water does not end with the pools. While visiting OLT property, the public is educated about how the same water they have been soaking in is also used to generate hydroelectric power for all electrical needs and to provide a direct source of heat for the buildings on the property. One of the springs also provides a source of crystal pure drinking water.

The existing facilities to be managed by OLT include:

  • 5 rustic cabins
  • 2 small (4 room) lodges
  • restrooms
  • welcome center and office
  • 2 saunas
  • swimming pool
  • 4 natural hot spring ponds
  • camping areas
  • hydroelectric power plant
  • road access and trails
  • bat cave viewing area
  • 1 employee residence

These facilities will be managed in a manner consistent with the mission and goals of Orient Land Trust; specifically, to preserve, protect, conserve, restore and enhance the natural systems and resource values of the property. All aspects of the property, especially the natural resources, will be closely monitored to assure that levels of use are not detrimental.

B. Developing public outreach programs to encourage the use of the unique resources of the land by both professional and lay people for educational purposes.

Percent of time devoted to this activity: 25%

1. Geology

Who is involved in this activity: Volunteers, including members of the Board, and OLT staff, working with professionals, educators and lay people.

Activity to date: The Orient Mine is an area of scientific interest because of the unusual geology which caused the iron deposit to form. The hot springs area is interesting geologically because of the fault line which caused the hot springs to surface. Over the past three decades at least three people have pursued graduate degrees based on research of the mine or fault zone area. More recently, in June 2001, one of the Board members, Dr. James McCalpin, conducted a college level course in the field studying the geology of the fault scarp running through the property. A trench has been dug across the fault line on the property to enable students, professionals and other lay persons to learn about the geology of the fault zone. See Exhibit I for a list of the groups who have visited the exposed fault site. There is no charge for this activity.

Future Plans: Dr. McCalpin is developing associations with the area public schools to provide opportunities for students to learn about the geologic features of the trust lands.

2. Bat Colony

Who is involved in this activity: Volunteers, including members of the board, liaisons, and OLT staff, working with Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW) staff, other professionals, educators and lay people.

Activity to date: The colony of bats which summers at the Orient Mine has been a very popular educational tool for two decades. This includes a master’s degree earned by a student who lived at the mine and studied the bats for two summers. Nearly every summer the CDOW has brought a group, largely made up of public school science teachers, to the mine to learn about the bats and see their out-flight. In the early 1990’s the Audubon Chapter from Salida, Colorado, brought a group of close to a hundred people to observe the bats. On a regular basis, many of Valley View’s visitors hike to the mine to witness the out-flight summer evenings. In 2002, work was completed to improve safety and access to the “glory hole” where the bats emerge. The Colorado Bureau of Mine Reclamation (CBMR), in conjunction with CDOW and OLT board implemented trail improvements, safety fencing and signage. There is no charge for this activity.

Future Plans: Expand current work with CDOW to have the Orient Mine become a “Watchable Wildlife” site. Work with CDOW, Bat Conservation International (BCI), CBMR and other organizations to continue improvement to trails and signage for the location.

3. Spelunking

Who is involved in this activity: OLT staff and several spelunking organizations.

Activity to date: The Orient Mine lies in a limestone layer that has been turned nearly vertical by the formation of the Rocky Mountains. Besides the man-made mine tunnels and shafts, natural caves have recently been discovered. Spelunking groups from the Colorado Air Force Academy, a local fire department and others have spent many hours surveying and mapping the passageways and caverns. Only a fraction of the natural cave has been explored to date. There is no charge for this activity.

Future Plans: Encourage the complete exploration and documentation of the natural cave. Possibly produce a video of the cave for the public to enjoy.

4. Hydroelectric and geothermal applications

Who is involved in this activity: Volunteers, members of the board, and OLT staff.

Activity to date: Hundreds of people, both local and visitors from far away, have toured the hydroelectric plant which provides all electricity, up to 93 kilowatts, used at Valley View Hot Springs. The hydroelectric plant was originally constructed in 1975 and expanded in 1981 with the help of a $28,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Appropriate Technology program. It has been featured on a PBS television series on alternative energy. Visitors are also educated about the use of geothermal energy to heat all buildings constructed in the last twenty-five years. Overall, Valley View Hot Springs is a model for renewable energy use, as it is completely off the local power grid and uses no fossil fuels other than in the larger vehicles. There is no charge for this activity.

Future Plans: OLT will continue to provide a resource for local schools, residents and other visitors to learn about hydroelectric and geothermal energy uses. We plan to keep up with developments in the electric vehicle industry and hydrogen production. We will possibly also build a geothermal greenhouse in the future.

In all of the areas of interest above, a variety of programs are being developed to offer to the public and interested groups. These may include: evening workshops, discussion groups, presentations, performances and course series; half day and full day seminars, weekend workshops, conferences or longer term programs of one or more weeks for in-depth study of selected topics.

5. General public outreach

Who is involved in this activity: OLT staff, members of the board, OLT members and volunteers.

Activity to date: In March 2001, shortly after the creation of OLT, a letter from OLT was included in a mailing to over 2,000 households on the Valley View Hot Springs’ mailing list. Its purpose was to educate the people who are likely to become supporters of OLT regarding its mission, proposed activities and goals and to encourage them to become supporting members of OLT. Since that time, at least two mailings a year have been sent to the entire mailing list, now over 4,000 households. The most recent mailing has greatly broadened OLT’s base of support among Valley View’s long time visitors. The OLT web site, Land Trust Alliance membership and Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts membership are very effective tools for public outreach. In addition, the Welcome Center presents information to acquaint all visitors with the existence of the Orient Land Trust and its mission and goals. Presently there are 460 donating members to the Orient Land Trust. By 2005 OLT memberships are expected to number over 1,500. Public outreach is also evidenced by a strong desire from people in a 250 mile radius area who wish to serve on the Board of Directors.

Future Plans: OLT will continue to send out regular mailings to all persons who have an interest in the continued preservation of these lands. The web site will expand its outreach to those who are not aware of the unique natural and historical features of OLT lands.

C. Pursuing ongoing projects with various agencies and groups to promote the preservation of the lands proposed to be included in the Orient Land Trust.

Percent of time devoted to this activity: 20%

Biological Inventory Study

Who is involved in this activity: Volunteers, board of directors, members of OLT, and OLT staff, working with Colorado Natural Heritage Program (CNHP), The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW), Soil Conservation District and San Luis Valley Graphical Information System.

Activity to date: In 1998 the Colorado Natural Heritage Program prepared a biological inventory study for The Nature Conservancy. In that study the Valley View Hot Springs and Orient Mine area was found to have high biodiversity significance. See Exhibit D. OLT is working to identify and preserve the plant and animal populations which have special significance.

Future plans: OLT will continue to work closely with concerned government agencies to ensure that the environment, including the water, plants and animals, particularly indigenous species, and all other components of the ecosystem, are protected. A baseline will be prepared for the lands under the control of OLT so that the success of preservation policies can be measured. OLT will utilize tools such as habitat conservation and cooperative management plans to facilitate the goal of preserving the environment.

Colorado Natural Areas Designation

Who is involved in this activity: Volunteers including members of the board, and OLT staff, working with Colorado Natural Areas Council (CNAC).

Activity to date: In November, 2001, the CNAC, a division of the Colorado State Parks, registered the Orient Mine with the Colorado Natural Areas Program. In September, 2002, the Council visited the Orient Mine. Following that visit, Articles of Designation to include the Orient Mine in the Colorado Natural Areas Program were drafted and awaiting approval. See Exhibit E.

Future plans: The Board will continue to work with the CNAC to achieve official designation of the Orient Mine as a Colorado Natural Area.

Preserving the ecology, particularly the bat habitat, of the Orient Mine area.

Who is involved in this activity: Volunteers, including OLT members and OLT Board members and liaisons, working with officials of the Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW), and representatives of Bat Conservation International (BCI).

Activity to date: In 1999 members of CDOW, BCI, The Nature Conservancy and wildlife officers from other states met at Valley View Hot Springs for a workshop. Discussion was held on the best way to make the Orient Mine readily accessible to the public for the appreciation of the bat colony, while preserving the environment of the area. See Exhibit F. In July, 2001, the Bats/Inactive Mines Project held a meeting at the Orient Mine which was attended by eleven of their staff and volunteers.

Future Plans: Continue working with all of the above agencies and organizations, and others, to assure that the habitat of the bats is preserved.

Preservation of the history of Valley View Hot Springs and Orient Mine.

Who is involved in this activity: Volunteers, board of directors, OLT members, OLT staff and historical organizations.

Activity to date: In the years they have operated Valley View Hot Springs, the founders have endeavored to preserve all the structures remaining which are representative of the time when the area around the hot springs was first inhabited and developed. An abstract of the property has been completed. Articles published in several newspapers as well as our own newsletters solicit photos and personal accounts from the early years. The Welcome Center has a library which has numerous books and collected photos about the Denver Rio Grande Narrow Gauge Railroad, Orient Mine, Valley View Hot Springs and San Luis Valley. The staff is educated about the history of OLT lands, as well the history of the rest of the San Luis Valley, to enable them to enrich the public’s appreciation of the history of the area. Many people visit who are interested in the history of the area.

Future Plans: The OLT property is mentioned in numerous historical publications. A project to publish a document that incorporates all of these publications along with primary sources is planned.

D. Fund-raising

Percent of time devoted to this activity: 7%

Who is involved in this activity: Board of directors and OLT staff and volunteers.

Activity to date: Since its beginning in 2001, OLT has quickly developed a broad base of support among people who care about this special place. The number of contributors at the end of 2001 was 90; that number, currently 460, is steadily climbing. OLT has also raised funds by selling candy and donated aluminum cans. See financial statements in Form 1023 Part IV. The total amount donated to date is $44,000.

Future Plans: In addition to continuing to broaden the base of public support through regular mailings to individuals who have expressed interest in the future of these lands, board members and staff with experience in grant-writing and other forms of fundraising will pursue other sources of funding. In particular, plans will be developed to provide a source of funding which would enable OLT to purchase the properties as described in the next section if and when they become available.

E. Pursue acquisition of the remaining property designated as Primary Trust Lands (not already slated to be donated by founders).

Percent of time devoted to this activity: 5%

Who is involved in this activity: Board of directors and OLT staff.

1. Remainder of Section 36 owned by Colorado State Land Board. (480 acres)

Activity to date: A surface and recreation lease currently held by founders will be transferred to the Orient Land Trust. The founders have had ongoing negotiations with the State Land Board to acquire this property for the last fifteen years.

Future Plans: The board will keep contact with the Colorado State Land Board. If an agreement is reached, OLT will initiate a fund-raising drive to acquire the property.

2. Cottonwood Ranch (760 acres)

Activity to date: The Cottonwood Ranch is downstream from OLT lands. The hot springs water continues onto this property. Currently, the part of the ranch adjacent to OLT has been divided into five smaller lots which are for sale. With the mission of preserving land in the area, this property would be ideal for inclusion in OLT. Part of it could be developed as wetlands, with the rest continuing to operate as a working ranch. The board has expressed interest in purchasing the whole ranch and current owners have indicated they are willing to sell. In the fall 2002 mailing, a survey returned 1102 responses of which 88% approved of OLT acquiring the Cottonwood Ranch. Immediate donations totaled $11,960 and $647,000 was pledged over the next ten years.

Future Plans: The board will continue negotiations with the owners of Cottonwood Ranch to see if terms can be reached to achieve its inclusion in OLT.

2. Bishop property (10 acres)

Activity to date: OLT board has expressed interest in purchasing this property, but current owners are not interested in selling at this time.

Future Plans: The board will keep close contact with the current owners and if they agree to sell, will initiate a fund-raising drive to enable OLT to purchase it.

F. Staff Development

Percent of time devoted to this activity: 3%

Who is involved in this activity: Board of directors, OLT staff and volunteers.

Activity to date: In May, 2001, one of the founders of OLT attended a conference for the Southwest Region of the Land Trust Alliance (LTA). OLT directors have also attended meetings of other Land Trust organizations in the area. In addition, the staff of Valley View Hot Springs has been educated about OLT, its mission and goals. On December 15, 2002, the OLT board approved a resolution to bring OLT’s operating practices into compliance with the LTA’s Standards and Practices by the end of 2003.

Future Plans: Board members and staff will participate in other training opportunities, both within the organization and through other resources. Staff will also develop programs to attract volunteers to help with various OLT programs and to provide them with orientation, supervision, and recognition.

Part II, Item 3. Fundraising Program

To date, all of OLT’s fundraising has been in the form of soliciting donations from a broad base of individuals who have an interest in the future of these lands. See sample solicitation attached as Exhibit I.

Our fundraising efforts are directed toward the following:

  • Contacting the 2,430 previous Valley View Hot Springs members by mail and email to convert them to Orient Land Trust contributing members. Currently 460 members have donated $45,000. OLT expects to raise more than $150,000 per year from 1,500 contributing memberships by the year 2005. Memberships will start at $12 in order to build a large number of supporters. All prospective members are currently receiving a semi-annual newsletter.
  • Contact over 5,000 previous and all future visitors to the Orient Land Trust lands by mail and email to encourage special donations to a separate fund for the purchase of additional adjoining properties. This fundraiser would last several years. Started November 2002 this effort has so far collected $11,960 donated and $647,000 pledged (over ten years) from 973 people.
  • Several fundraising events are planned for 2003 such as fireworks sponsoring and a dinner-dance.
  • In the future, several of the current directors who have extensive experience with grants and foundations will pursue those sources of support, especially in connection with any possible additional land acquisitions.

Part II, Item 4a and 4b. Directors and Officers

Name and Address Positions Current Annual Compensation

Douglas Bishop, Board Director
29990 CR 65
Moffat, CO 81143

Robin Byers, Board Director
1530 Kalmia Ave
Boulder, CO 80304

Linda Joseph, Board Director and Chairperson
64001 CR DD
Moffat, CO 81143

James McCalpin, Board Director and Vice-chairperson
600 East Galena Avenue
P.O. Box 837
Crestone, CO 81131

Chris Miller, Board Director
3107 W Colorado Ave #231
Colorado Springs, CO 80904

Harold Pratt Board Director
7400 W Grant Ranch Blvd #24
Littleton, CO 80123

Enter new board members here March 3, 2003

Neil Seitz, Executive Director
P.O. Box 146
Villa Grove, CO 81155-0065

Terry Seitz, Treasurer
P.O. Box 146
Villa Grove, CO 81155-0065

Sonia Walter Secretary
P.O. Box 213
Villa Grove, CO 81155

Part II, Item 8. Assets Used in Exempt Activity

  • Land, which includes a bat cave, three historical sites, campsites for visitors and geothermal springs.
  • Buildings, which include lodging, restrooms, administration space, employee housing and space for conducting programs.
  • Hydroelectric and geothermal heating sites.
  • A current mailing list of five thousand addresses of visitors to the land.
  • Supplies, equipment, furniture, tools and a vehicle.

Part II, Item 11. Membership

As of February 2003 there are 480 members who have donated a total of $47,000. The members hail from 158 cities in 29 states.

Membership to Orient Land Trust (OLT) has several facets especially when OLT leases 1,170 acres of Valley View Hot Springs (VVHS) property starting January 1, 2004. At that time the membership will be linked to use of the property as well as current purposes and goals. Valley View Hot Springs has been a membership organization for 25 years. Orient Land Trust will convert the VVHS members to OLT members by the end of 2003. The total number of OLT members should be over 1,200 starting 2004.

Described below is a description of that merged annual membership.

11a. Membership Requirements

  1. The fees required for a membership may be satisfied (partially or fully) by several ways to allow for the many members who have expressed desire to do so.
    1. Payment
    2. Working on the property
    3. Working with public outreach or fundraising
    4. Donating goods or services
  2. The range of membership levels will be broad for the most public outreach.
    1. ($12) Minimum membership for the person who just wants to stay on the mailing list and keep informed.
    2. ($20 - $50) Low-range membership for those who:
    3. Don’t use the property but wish to contribute more than the minimum.
    4. Use the property but not on weekends and holidays.
    5. ($50 - $150) Mid-range membership for those who want limited weekend and holiday use of the property.
    6. ($150 - $250) High-range membership for those who want unlimited weekend and holiday use of the property.
    7. ($300 +) Ultra-membership for those who wish to give the most.

11b. Expanding Membership

  1. Using the membership and registration records from Valley View Hot Springs (VVHS) to contact groups who have been involved with Orient Land Trust property.
    1. 536 current VVHS members are not yet OLT members
    2. 1,273 addresses are previous VVHS member applicants
    3. 7,500 addresses other than (a) and (b) above have visited VVHS since the year 2000
  2. Expanding beyond people who have visited the property.
    1. World Wide Web
    2. Presence and sponsorship at various local events with membership materials
    3. Crestone Music Festival
    4. Villa Grove Pottery Workshop
    5. Saguache County Fall Festival
    6. Saguache County Museum Parade
    7. Evens in nearby towns of Center, Alamosa and Salida,
    8. Using current members to add friends as members. Current members are now located in 29 states.
    9. Board members will add members from their area which is big part of Colorado and New Mexico.
  3. See Exhibit I for Fundraising Materials Samples
    1. Pamphlets
    2. Newsletters
    3. Letters

11c. Membership Benefits

  1. The memberships described above may receive one or more benefits. These are possible benefits and not fully implemented. The following benefits still require normal admission and accommodation fees as required except the last (l).
    1. Newsletter mailed or email to member
    2. Membership card
    3. Summer weekday use of the property
    4. Winter weekend use of the property
    5. Unlimited use of the property
    6. Invitations to special events, seminars and gatherings
    7. Participation in special tours and outings
    8. Special recognition on the web and engraved items
    9. Accommodation reservation preference
    10. Special “members only” day
    11. Small item of gratitude such as a T-shirt or book
    12. Admission discount or pass

Part II, Item 12a. Visitor Fees and Charges

  • Admission to the geothermal areas of the property has a fee due to the large demand and upkeep. All children under 16 years old are admitted free of charge. Fees are discounted for those in need. The current fees are:
Type of Admission
(Over 15 years old.)
Winter
Oct-Apr
Summer
May-Sept
Less than 2 hour use $2.00 $8.00
Full day use $6.00 $12.00
Overnight use
(Includes day use)
$16.00 $24.00
  • Nine overnight private accommodations on the property have a fee in addition to the above overnight admission fee due to the large demand and upkeep. All public accommodations (communal lodge and campsites) do not have an additional fee and are included in the overnight admission fee above. Fees are discounted for those in need. The fees are:
Type of Accommodation Winter
Oct-April
Summer
May-Sept
Small Cabin $15.00 $30.00
Room with kitchen use $22.00 $30.00
Large Cabin $30.00 $45.00
  • About a dozen history and geothermal books, as well as maps of the area, are sold at a discount price.
  • A few snacks, non alcoholic beverages and personal items are sold at cost for the convenience of visitors and employees.

Part IV, Item A, Column (b). Year 2002

Line 7 – Other Income

Recycled Donated Aluminum Cans

234

Line 7 – Total Amount

234

Line 22 – Other Expenses

Cost of Sales

3,252

Legal Expenses

3,660

Office Supplies

88

Permits, Licenses, Dues and Fees

356

Printing and Postage

68

Sales and Lodging Tax

54

Telecommunications

523

Line 22 – Total Amount

8,001

Part IV, Item A, Column (c). Year 2003

Line 17 – Officers & Directors Compensation

Name

Position

Time Devoted

Annual

(To be hired)

Assistant Director

Full Time starting August

15,000

Line 17 – Total Amount

$15,000

Line 22 – Other Expenses

Capital Equipment

3,500

Cost of Sales

3,300

Land Acquisition Program

28,500

Legal Expenses

4,000

Office Supplies

600

Other Programs

1,800

Payroll Company Costs

2,700

Permits, Licenses, Dues and Fees

600

Printing and Postage

400

Sales and Lodging Tax

100

Telecommunications

750

Vehicle Operation Expense

1,000

Volunteer Management Program

2,500

Line 22 – Total Amount

49,750

Part IV, Item A, Column (d). Year 2004

Line 15 – Contributions, gifts and grants

Recipient

Purpose

Amount

Bat Conservation International

Bat habitat management

500

Baca-Crestone Grande Land Trust

Annual membership

500

Crestone-Moffat Business Assoc.

Annual membership

100

KRCC Public Radio

Annual membership

100

KRZA Public Radio

Annual membership

100

Moffat Consolidated School

Teacher grants for field trips

600

Mountain Valley School

Teacher grants for field trips

600

Naturist Education Foundation

Annual membership

1,000

Rio Grande Headwaters Land Trust

Annual membership

500

Saguache County Museum

Annual membership

200

San Luis Valley Ecosystem Council

Annual membership

100

San Luis Valley Historical Society

Annual membership

100

San Luis Valley Regional Science Fair

Annual membership

500

Villa Grove Area Merchants Assoc.

Annual membership

100

Line 15 – Total Amount

$5,000

Line 17 – Officers & Directors Compensation

Name

Position

Time Devoted

Annual

Teresa Seitz

Book Keeper

900 Hours per year

13,000

(To be hired)

Assistant Director

Full Time

36,000

Neil Seitz

Executive Director

Full Time

48,000

Line 17 – Total Amount

$97,000

Line 22 – Other Expenses

Capital Equipment

19,000

Capital Projects

40,000

Cost of Sales

14,000

Guest Services

17,000

Land Acquisition Program

113,000

Office Supplies

5,000

Other Programs

9,000

Payroll Company Costs

50,000

Legal, Permits, Licenses, Dues and Fees

8,000

Printing and Postage

4,000

Sales and Lodging Tax

4,000

Telecommunications

3,000

Vehicle Operating Expense

6,000

Volunteer Management Program

11,000

Line 22 – Total Amount

303,000

Schedule I, Item 1. Nature of Predecessor’s Actuaries

Valley View Hot Springs maintained the land and rustic facilities, derived income from admission and user fees, employed eight people and operated for twenty-seven years.

Schedule I, Item 3. Relationship of Owners of Predecessor to Applicant Organization

Neil Seitz is a cofounder and interim executive director of Orient Land Trust. Teresa (Terry) Seitz is a cofounder and treasurer of the board of directors of Orient Land Trust. All above positions are currently without pay. Neil and Teresa Seitz may become paid employees of the applicant organization at a wage consistent with staff of similar organizations, to be determined by the disinterested members of the board of directors. Neil and Terry Seitz will also be substantial contributors of land to Orient Land Trust.

Schedule I, Item 4a and 4b. Terms of Transfer from Predecessor to Applicant Organization

Land and buildings will be donated by Neil and Teresa (Terry) Seitz parcel by parcel over a period of time scheduled by the donors or upon the death of both donors. Prior to the conveyance of fee simple title to various parcels, Neil and Terry Seitz may also donate conservation easements on one or more of the land parcels to third party organizations, such as the Colorado Division of Wildlife or The Nature Conservancy, in order to assure protection of the land.

The business of Valley View Hot Springs will be donated to OLT. OLT will assume all subsequent revenue, expenses, operations, liabilities and taxes.

Because no sale of property to OLT is contemplated, no appraisals are attached.

Schedule I, Item 5. Lease from Predecessor

All land and buildings, other than the personal residence of Neil and Terry Seitz, will be leased to OLT for $1 per year prior to their donation of various parcels to OLT. See lease attached as Exhibit G.

Schedule I, Item 7. New Operating Policies

The OLT Board of Directors, comprised of local community leaders and volunteers, will assume governance control and responsibility for all lands and operations.

Restrictions to admission will be based on capacity of the facilities, determined by monitoring and maintaining natural areas and standards of use, in order to ensure protection of OLT property.

Admission fees will be set to minimize financial barriers to access and use, and free use for educational and research purposes will be continued and expanded.

Financial support will shift to greater reliance on gifts, grants and membership fees.

Orient Land Trust is a nonprofit land trust
dedicated to the preservation of Valley View Hot Springs (VVHS) and its viewshed—
including natural and biologic resources, agricultural lands, wildlife habitat,
open space, and historic and geologic features of the northern San Luis Valley—
for the education and enjoyment of current and future generations.